Lighght

Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine
Lighght - Dago Santos - Phases Magazine

In “Lighght,” the act of making a photograph is used to respond to a visceral impulse that occur, almost always spontaneously and unplanned, in those fleeting moments when the commonplace suddenly bursts out into a pulse of the lyrical, when the prosaic turns into the poetic, when the habitual becomes extraordinary. In Sontag’s “On photography,” the photographer is described as a solitary walker, stalking and cruising, and in the end becoming adept at the joys of watching. He is the flaneur who finds the world “picturesque.” The photographs in “Lighght” were ┬ámade during states when the photographer was thatflaneur,┬ásensitive to the innate need to see beauty and to seize it before it goes away with it’s tenuous grip with reality. A hand jutting out into the light on the ancient walls of a Roman arena, the headlights of a car making it’s imprint on a slowly exposed film, a deer crossing unexpectedly in the line of sight, all these moments represent the rewards of looking, of sensing, and of responding to a world that pulses and breaths that ineffable quality.